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Determining state-to-state migration with tax returns

The IRS has released Migration Data for 2015-2016. These data look at year-to-year address changes reported on individual income tax returns. These data track state and county level in and out flows of tax returns along with providing aggregate Adjusted Gross Income (AGI). A net-migration number for states and counties can be calculated looking at the difference between the inflows and outflows. Even though AGI is provided, it cannot be used to calculate income losses or gains. These back-of-the-envelope calculations can lead…

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Population Growth in Connecticut

The Census Bureau has released the 2017 population estimates for all towns in Connecticut. From July 1, 2016 to July 1, 2017: Connecticut’s net population grew by an estimated 499 people. Stamford tops the list as the town with the highest numeric increase of people, estimated at 1,170 people While Bloomfield had the highest percent increase from 2016 to 2017, with a 3.9% increase. The following table lists the top 15 towns with the largest numeric population increase between July 1, 2016 to July 1, 2017: Rank Town Numeric…

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CTData and Liberal Arts Action Lab at Trinity College, receive 500 Cities Data Challenge grant!

The Urban Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation designed this challenge grant to encourage communities to delve into the 500 Cities open-access dataset, to design innovative solutions on social factors that influence health, and to guide local organizations on how to effectively use neighborhood-level data. The broader goal is to promote more comprehensive cross-collaborative approaches to foster a broader “Culture of Health” in urban areas. By sharing resources and expertise, the Connecticut Data Collaborative and the Action Lab will…

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Open Data gets Codified! Data Legislation HB 5517 passed!

I’m re-posting an older post where we were looking for support for HB 5517. Great news, the legislation was passed on the last night of the session! Thank you to everyone who advocated, testified, and wrote letters to their legislators. We are excited about the components of the legislation (there’s more than only codifying EO#39). Join our open data call on Tuesday from 3-4 to learn more from the State’s Chief Data Officer, Tyler Kleykamp. Public hearing is today at…

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Why the citizenship question is cause for worry

On our monthly open data calls, we have provided updates on data in the news and the biggest newsmaker by far has been Census 2020. Besides the challenges the Census Bureau has faced in maintaining their federal funding and finding new leadership, a recent hiccup has put the accuracy of the Census 2020 count in jeopardy. Several months ago, the Justice department made a request that a question on citizenship be included in the Census 2020 count. Advocates raised concerns…

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Where are Opioid deaths occurring in Connecticut?

Opioid deaths have doubled and tripled in some towns in Connecticut in only six years. Bridgeport, New Haven, Waterbury, and Hartford have the highest rates per population. However, many smaller towns have seen their rates of death triple as well. The Connecticut Medical Examiner published accidental drug related deaths from 2012-2017 on data.ct.gov. We take these data and do a fair amount of cleaning (see Jenna Daly’s post, “Accidental Opioid-related deaths in CT and the importance of data cleaning.”) to…

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New Housing Data Portal

Today we are launching what is the beginning of a housing data portal: housing.ctdata.org! This project began as a quest to understand the difference between multiple data sources for a particular indicator. The inquiry evolved into this new data portal focused on multiple sources of housing data. This housing data portal gives users the ability to explore, download, and analyze housing data in your town. We examined the strengths and weaknesses of different data sources to help users make data-informed…

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Are the Outcomes of Stops Different Across Racial Groups?

This is a re-release of the original post from November. The diagram below now includes Hispanic drivers. When distinguishing between Hispanic and Non-Hispanic drivers, you can observe a more accurate representation of the population across Connecticut. In this data story, we explore the outcomes of traffic stops. Is there a difference by race in the issuance rate of warnings, tickets or some other outcome? In particular, is there a difference by race in terms of the type of infractions imposed on…

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Traffic Stop Statistics in Connecticut

In partnership with the Institute for Municipal and Regional Policy at Central Connecticut State University, we are providing an overview of the three years of data collected as part of the Racial Profiling Prohibition Project. First, we look at the different traffic stop categories: Motor Vehicle Violations, Equipment Violations, and Investigative Stops. Then, we examine the breakdown of those categories into reasons why drivers get pulled over. Some reasons may fall under different categories. For example, a stop for registration…

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